Oregon Common Core State Standards (ccss) English Language Arts (ela) Crosswalk

Oregon Common Core State Standards (CCSS) English Language Arts (ELA)

CROSSWALK: LANGUAGE

Oregon Department of Education

C

ONTENTS:

CROSSWALK - ELA CCSSs and corresponding Oregon ELA Standards

Summary Analysis, Gaps, Implications for Implementation

Language Standards 1 - 6, Grades K - 11/12: pp. 1-16

  • Standard 1 table summary (“grammar and usage when writing or speaking”): p. 4

  • Standard 2 table summary (“capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing”): p. 7

  • Standards 1-3, Language Progressive Skills, by Grade (from CCSS): p. 10 (CCSS Language Standards 1-3 marked with an asterisk.)

  • Standard 5 table summary (“figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings”): pp. 14-15

I

DRAFT

NTRODUCTION

Oregon Common Core State Standards (CCSS) English Language Arts (ELA) Crosswalk

Transitioning to the Common Core

When Oregon adopted the Common Core State Standards in October 2010, our state joined other states in the pursuit of a common, standards-based education for our students, kindergarten through high school. Common standards can increase the likelihood that all students, no matter where they live, are prepared for success in college and the work place.

Because skillful reading, writing, language use, and speaking and listening are similar across the states, common standards make sense. They make possible common achievement goals for grade level groups and also efficiencies of scale for instructional and professional development materials. In today’s world, common assessments and access to common resources also make sense.

The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English Language Arts (ELA) & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects (“the Standards”) will prepare Oregon students and students in other CCSS states to be proficient in the four strands of the English language arts skills—Reading, Writing, Language, and Speaking and Listening. These skills are essential for success in school and beyond.

Additionally in Oregon, proficiency in the Essential Skills of Reading, Writing, and Speaking and Listening will be required to earn an Oregon Diploma. The Common Core provides a clear continuum to teach students those specific skills, refining them year by year, from kindergarten through grade 12, across the four CCSS strands.

Change

Because the CCSS will provide updated ELA expectations for our students, change will be required in curriculum and assessment. We acknowledge change is not easy because anything new requires time to learn. However, as the Common Core Standards build on the strong foundational standards already represented in many state standards, including those in Oregon, the changes are not overwhelming.

The CCSS are new to every state adopting them—in part because they were developed from end-of-grade 12 College and Career Readiness (CCR) Anchor Standards down to kindergarten using a reverse design approach. Consequently, each grade-specific standard corresponds to the same CCR Anchor Standard by number. For easy reference, the strand-specific CCR Anchor Standards are displayed on the covers of the Crosswalk.

The overarching goal of the Common Core is for all students to be college and career-ready. To make that goal a reality, an integrated model of literacy was used to design the standards. While the CCSS are made up of four separate strands to maintain clarity—Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language—the standards across the four strands are interrelated and cross-referenced as they are intended to be clustered for instruction.

A Plan for Transition

Planning how to begin using a new set of standards is challenging. Where does a district start implementing? With a particular grade? With a particular strand? With professional development for everyone? Having a crosswalk between the new and the old provides the context necessary to develop a plan for transition that can help answer those questions.

The CCSS ELA Crosswalk

Designed as a planning tool to assist Oregon education leaders in the transition to the CCSS, the K-12 Crosswalk is made up of four documents, one for each strand, that compare the CCSS to the Oregon English Language Arts Standards adopted in 2003. The purpose of the Crosswalk is to help educators make sense of the CCSS within the context of the Oregon standards without having to create their own comparison. The Crosswalk includes comparison as well as summary information on each Common Core Standard.

Using the Crosswalk

The CCR Anchor Standards are the backbone of the CCSS for every grade in every strand, with one exception—the Foundational Reading Skills Standards for K-5 do not have anchor standards. The Crosswalk provides an analysis of every CCSS with the CCRs as organizers:

  • Foundational Reading Skills Standards (CCSS), K-5 only

Reading CCRs

  • Literature Standards (CCSS)

  • Informational Text Standards (CCSS)

Language CCRs

  • Language Standards (CCSS)

Writing CCRs

  • Writing Standards (CCSS)

Speaking and Listening CCRs

  • Speaking and Listening Standards (CCSS)

Here’s how it works: The CCR Anchor Standard appears in bold at the top of the page (with the exception of the Foundational Reading Skills Standards where the Standard is listed at the top of the page). The CCSS connected to that CCR are displayed in a table beneath. Related Oregon standards, shaded, follow. The bottom row of the table is a Summary Analysis of the comparison of the two sets of standards. Following the Summary Analysis is a list of noticeable Gaps and a place for noting Implications for Implementation. This last section has been left mostly blank for districts and schools to note site-specific implications during transition planning. The Comment column on the right side of the page aggregates observations for each row. (In order to display similar skills in the same row, a few of the CCSS lower case letters have been reordered.) In some instances, a Notes section appears before Gaps indicating differences in organizational structure between the two sets of standards.

CCSS Resources

The department is finding ways to assist districts and to maximize efficiencies as Oregon transitions to the CCSS. Providing the ELA Crosswalk is one way. Similarly, the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), a co-sponsor of the Common Core States Standards Initiative (CCSSI), is assisting CCSS states. Creating professional development materials (including copyright permissions for grade band text) written by lead ELA standards writers, Sue Pimentel and David Coleman, is one way. These materials will be available beginning June 2011. Additional resources drawn from Oregon’s ELA Crosswalk will be available in June 2011.

As they are completed, the ELA Crosswalk and other Oregon-developed resources and resources from other organizations like CCSSO will be posted on the ODE ELA CCSS webpage that is linked from the ODE CCSS landing page (to find from the ODE homepage, search ccssor add go/commoncore to the address; then link to ELA). These web pages, continuously updated, are designed to assist Oregon educators in

  • Gathering information, resources, and tools, including examples submitted from Oregon districts, for planning their transition to the CCSS

  • Locating professional development materials to begin CCSS implementation.

Acknowledgements

The Oregon Department of Education (ODE) acknowledges the Northwest Regional Comprehensive Center (NWRCC), in collaboration with Education Northwest, for convening representatives from higher education, state agencies, ESDs, and districts from across five states in a two-day symposium, February 8 - 9, 2011, in Portland that provided the context and impetus for the creation of the Oregon CCSS ELA Crosswalk. The Common Core State Standards: Planning for Effective Implementation focused on CCSS implementation challenges and potential solutions…and inspired collaborative work. Professor Beth LaForce, George Fox University, and Professor Mindy Legard Larson, Linfield College, offered to work with ODE on creating CCSS resources for Oregon districts and preservice teachers. Following the symposium, Professor LaForce sent ODE a grade 1-6 crosswalk of the CCSS to Oregon standards created by preservice students. That document provided the starting point for the crosswalk project. ODE wishes to thank Professor LaForce and her students.

CCSS LANGUAGE

Conventions of Standard English - Language Standard 1

CCR Anchor Standard: "Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking."

Grade K

Grade 1

Grade 2

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 9-10

Grade 11-12

Comments

Common Core State Standards

1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

a. Print many upper- and lowercase letters.

a. Print all upper- and lowercase letters.

  • [Printing]

c. Form regular plural nouns orally by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog, dogs; wish, wishes).

b. Use common, proper, and possessive nouns.

a. Use collective nouns (e.g., group).

b. Form and use regular and irregular plural nouns.

a. Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative adverbs (where, when, why).

a. Ensure that pronouns are in the proper case (subjective, objective, possessive).

  • [Nouns and pronouns, interrogatives]

d. Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).

d. Use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I, me, my; they, them, their; anyone, everything).

b. Form and use frequently occurring irregular plural nouns (e.g., feet, children, teeth, mice, fish).

c. Use abstract nouns (e.g., childhood).

b. Use intensive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves).

b. Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs.

c. Use reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves).

f. Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement.*

c. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in pronoun number and person.*

d. Recognize and correct vague pronouns (i.e., ones with unclear or ambiguous antecedents).*

c. Use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences (e.g., He hops; We hop).

d. Form and use the past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs (e.g., sat, hid, told).

d. Form and use regular and irregular verbs.

b. Form and use the progressive (e.g., I was walking; I am walking; I will be walking) verb tenses.

b. Form and use the perfect (e.g., I had walked; I have walked; I will have walked) verb tenses.

b. Form and use verbs in the active and passive voice.

  • [Verbs]

e. Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home).

e. Form and use the simple (e.g., I walked; I walk; I will walk) verb tenses.

c. Use modal auxiliaries (e.g., can, may, must) to convey various conditions.

c. Use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions.

c. Form and use verbs in the indicative, imperative, interrogative, conditional, and subjunctive mood.

d. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense.*

d. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb voice and mood.*

f. Use frequently occurring adjectives.

e. Use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.

a. Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences.

d. Order adjectives within sentences according to conventional patterns (e.g., a small red bag rather than a red small bag).

  • [Adjectives and adverbs, determiners]

h. Use determiners (e.g., articles, demonstratives).

g. Form and use comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.

e. Use the most frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of, by, with).

i. Use frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., during, beyond, toward).

e. Form and use prepositional phrases.

a. Explain the function of conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections in general and their function in particular sentences

  • [Prepositions]

g. Use frequently occurring conjunctions (e.g., and, but, or, so, because).

h. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.

e. Use correlative conjunctions (e.g., either/or, neither/nor).

  • [Conjunctions]

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