Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

Writing Standards K–5 W]

Grade 3 students:

Grade 4 students:

Grade 5 students:

Text Types and Purposes

  1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.

  1. Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons.

  2. Provide reasons that support the opinion.

  3. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for example) to connect opinion and reasons.

  4. Provide a concluding statement or section.

1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

  1. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer’s purpose.

  2. Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details.

  3. Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition).

  4. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.

  1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

  1. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s purpose.

  2. Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.

  3. Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically).

  4. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.

  1. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

  1. Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension.

  2. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.

  3. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to connect ideas within categories of information.

  4. Provide a concluding statement or section.

  1. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

  1. Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

  2. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.

  3. Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another, for example, also, because).

  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

  5. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.

  1. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

  1. Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

  2. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.

  3. Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially).

  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

  5. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.

  1. Write narratives and other creative texts to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

  1. Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

  2. Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations.

  3. Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order.

  4. Provide a sense of closure.

  1. Write narratives and other creative texts to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

  1. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

  2. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.

  3. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events.

  4. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.

  5. Provide a conclusion (when appropriate to the genre) that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

3. Write narratives and other creative texts to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

  1. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

  2. Use literary and narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.

  3. Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events.

  4. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.

  5. Provide a conclusion (when appropriate to the genre) that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

Writing Process: Production and Distribution of Writing

  1. With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

    1. Produce clear and coherent writing using appropriate media formats (e.g., screen plays, blogs, visual essays) in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

  1. Produce clear and coherent writing using appropriate media formats (e. g,, podcasts, digital storytelling, web pages) in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

  1. With guidance and support from peers and adults, use a writing process to develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, drafting, revising, and editing. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grade 3 on page 37.)

    1. With guidance and support from peers and adults, use a writing process to develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, drafting, revising, and editing. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grade 4 on page 37.)

  1. With guidance and support from peers and adults, use a writing process to develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, drafting, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grade 5 on page 37.)

  1. With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

6. With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.

6. With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of two pages in a single sitting.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.

7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.

  1. Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.

8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.

8. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources.

  1. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.

9. (Begins in grade 4)

  1. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

a. Apply grade 4 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions].”).

b. Apply grade 4 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., “Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text”).

9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

a. Apply grade 5 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., how characters interact]”).

b. Apply grade 5 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., “Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point[s]”).

Range of Writing

10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

C

Note on range and content
of student speaking and listening

To become college and career ready, students must have ample opportunities to take part in a variety of rich, structured conversations—as part of a whole class, in small groups, and with a partner—built around important content in various domains. They must be able to contribute appropriately to these conversations, to make comparisons and contrasts, and to analyze and synthesize a multitude of ideas in accordance with the standards of evidence appropriate to a particular discipline. Whatever their intended major or profession, high school graduates will depend heavily on their ability to listen attentively to others so that they are able to build on others’ meritorious ideas while expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

New technologies have broadened and expanded the role that speaking and listening play in acquiring and sharing knowledge and have tightened their link to other forms of communication. The Internet has accelerated the speed at which connections between speaking, listening, reading, and writing can be made, requiring that students be ready to use these modalities nearly simultaneously. Technology itself is changing quickly, creating a new urgency for students to be adaptable in response to change.

ollege and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking,

Viewing, Listening and Media Literacy

The grades K-5 standards on the following pages define what students should understand and be able to do by the end of each grade. They correspond to the College and Career Readiness (CCR) anchor standards below by number. The CCR and grade-specific standards are necessary complements—the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity—that together define the skills and understandings that all students must demonstrate.

Comprehension and Collaboration

1. Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

2. Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas

4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

5. Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.

6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Critical Media Literacy

  1. Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects (2)

    Документ
    © 2011 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Permission is hereby granted to copy any or all parts of this document for non-commercial educational purposes.
  2. Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in

    Документ
    This is the final draft of the English Language Arts standards proposed by the Minnesota Standards Review Committee. These standards will proceed through the state’s formal administrative rulemaking process and will not be adopted
  3. Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy

    Документ
    © 2011 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Permission is hereby granted to copy any or all parts of this document for non-commercial educational purposes.
  4. Oregon Common Core State Standards (ccss) English Language Arts (ela) Crosswalk

    Документ
    When Oregon adopted the Common Core State Standards in October 2010, our state joined other states in the pursuit of a common, standards-based education for our students, kindergarten through high school.
  5. Books on history of mathematics, science and technology

    Документ
    I started this in 1 in order to record books received. I have extracted relevant books from other lists, from lists of references in my papers and from Sections 1-3 of my Sources.
  6. Boolean Searching on the Internet: a primer in Boolean Logic

    Документ
    This fantastic PowerPoint offers a very concise (29 slides) rationale for teaching online reading strategies, identifies student behaviors that are indicators of poor reading strategies, and offers multiple suggestions for things teachers
  7. Office of the CommissionerAflatoxin (lac 7: XXVII. 128) 441 Children and Family Services

    Документ
    This public document was published at a total cost of $3,820. Five hundred copies of this public document were published in this monthly printing at a cost of $3,820.
  8. The Anthropology of Childhood

    Документ
    ��#ࡱ#� > �� u : : �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9
  9. Beginner Pre-Service Special Education Teachers’ Learning Experience During Practicum

    Документ
    Social Developmental Parameters in Primary Schools: Inclusive Settings’ and Gender Differences on Pupils’ Aggressive and Social Insecure Behaviour and their Attitudes Towards Disability

Другие похожие документы..