Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

They demonstrate independence.

Students can, without significant scaffolding, comprehend and evaluate complex texts across a range of types and disciplines, and they can construct effective arguments and convey intricate or multifaceted information. Likewise, students are able independently to discern a speaker’s key points, request clarification, and ask relevant questions. They build on others’ ideas, articulate their own ideas, and confirm they have been understood. Without prompting, they demonstrate command of standard English and acquire and use a wide-ranging vocabulary. More broadly, they become self-directed learners, effectively seeking out and using resources to assist them, including teachers, peers, and print and digital reference materials.

  • They build strong content knowledge.

Students establish a base of knowledge across a wide range of subject matter by engaging with works of quality and substance. They become proficient in new areas through research and study. They read purposefully and listen attentively to gain both general knowledge and discipline-specific expertise. They refine and share their knowledge through writing and speaking.

  • They respond to the varying demands of audience, task, purpose, and discipline.

Students adapt their communication in relation to audience, task, purpose, and discipline. They set and adjust purpose for reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language use as warranted by the task. They appreciate nuances, such as how the composition of an audience should affect tone when speaking and how the connotations of words affect meaning. They also know that different disciplines call for different types of evidence (e.g., documentary evidence in history, experimental evidence in science).

  • They comprehend as well as critique.

Students are engaged and open-minded—but discerning—readers and listeners. They work diligently to understand precisely what an author or speaker is saying, but they also question an author’s or speaker’s assumptions and premises and assess the veracity of claims and the soundness of reasoning.

  • They value evidence.

Students cite specific evidence when offering an oral or written interpretation of a text. They use relevant evidence when supporting their own points in writing and speaking, making their reasoning clear to the reader or listener, and they constructively evaluate others’ use of evidence.

  • They use technology and digital media strategically and capably.

Students employ technology thoughtfully to enhance their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language use. They tailor their searches online to acquire useful information efficiently, and they integrate what they learn using technology with what they learn offline. They are familiar with the strengths and limitations of various technological tools and mediums and can select and use those best suited to their communication goals.

  • They come to understand other perspectives and cultures.

Students appreciate that the twenty-first-century classroom and workplace are settings in which people from often widely divergent cultures and who represent diverse experiences and perspectives must learn and work together. Students actively seek to understand other perspectives and cultures through reading and listening, and they are able to communicate effectively with people of varied backgrounds. They evaluate other points of view critically and constructively. Through reading great classic and contemporary works of literature representative of a variety of periods, cultures, and worldviews, students can vicariously inhabit worlds and have experiences much different than their own.

How to Read This Document

Overall Document Organization

The Standards comprise three main sections: a comprehensive K–5 section and two content area–specific sections for grades 6–12, one for ELA and one for history/social studies, science, and technical subjects. Three appendices accompany the main document.

Each section is divided into strands. K–5 and 6–12 ELA have Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language strands; the 6–12 history/ social studies, science, and technical subjects section focuses on Reading and Writing. Each strand is headed by a strand-specific set of College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards that is identical across all grades and content areas.

Standards for each grade within K–8 and for grades 9–10 and 11–12 follow the CCR anchor standards in each strand. Each grade-specific standard (as these standards are collectively referred to) corresponds to the same-numbered CCR anchor standard. Put another way, each CCR anchor standard has an accompanying grade-specific standard translating the broader CCR statement into grade-appropriate end-of-year expectations.

Individual CCR anchor standards can be identified by their strand, CCR status, and number (R.6, for example). Individual grade-specific standards can be identified by their strand, grade, and number (or number and letter, where applicable), so that RI.4.3, for example, stands for Reading, Informational Text, grade 4, standard 3 and W.5.1a stands for Writing, grade 5, standard 1a. Strand designations can be found in brackets alongside the full strand title.

Who is responsible for which portion of the Standards?

A single K–5 section lists standards for reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language across the curriculum, reflecting the fact that most or all of the instruction students in these grades receive comes from one teacher. Grades 6–12 are covered in two content area–specific sections, the first for the English language arts teacher and the second for teachers of history/social studies, science, and technical subjects. Each section uses the same CCR anchor standards but also includes grade-specific standards tuned to the literacy requirements of the particular discipline(s).

Key Features of the Standards

Reading: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension

The Reading standards place equal emphasis on the sophistication of what students read and the skill with which they read. Standard 10 defines a grade-by-grade “staircase” of increasing text complexity that rises from beginning reading to the college and career readiness level. Whatever they are reading, students must also show a steadily growing ability to discern more from and make fuller use of text, including making an increasing number of connections among ideas and between texts, considering a wider range of textual evidence, and becoming more sensitive to inconsistencies, ambiguities, and poor reasoning in texts.

Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research

The Standards acknowledge the fact that whereas some writing skills, such as the ability to plan, revise, edit, and publish, are applicable to many types of writing, other skills are more properly defined in terms of specific writing types: arguments, informative/explanatory texts, and narratives. Standard 9 stresses the importance of the writing-reading connection by requiring students to draw upon and write about evidence from literary and informational texts. Because of the centrality of writing to most forms of inquiry, research standards are prominently included in this strand, though skills important to research are infused throughout the document.

Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration

Including but not limited to skills necessary for formal presentations, the Speaking and Listening standards require students to develop a range of broadly useful oral communication and interpersonal skills. Students must learn to work together, express and listen carefully to ideas, integrate information from oral, visual, quantitative, and media sources, evaluate what they hear, use media and visual displays strategically to help achieve communicative purposes, and adapt speech to context and task.

Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary

The Language standards include the essential “rules” of standard written and spoken English, but they also approach language as a matter of craft and informed choice among alternatives. The vocabulary standards focus on understanding words and phrases, their relationships, and their nuances and on acquiring new vocabulary, particularly general academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

Note: Bold type on the following pages represent additional draft language proposed by the Minnesota Standards Committee.



Appendices A, B, and C

Appendix A contains supplementary material on reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language as well as a glossary of key terms. Appendix B consists of text exemplars illustrating the complexity, quality, and range of reading appropriate for various grade levels with accompanying sample performance tasks. Appendix C includes annotated samples demonstrating at least adequate performance in student writing at various grade levels.

Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards in

English Language Arts&

Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

K–5

C

Note on range and content
of student reading

To build a foundation for college and career readiness, students must read widely and deeply from among a broad range of high-quality, increasingly challenging literary and informational texts. Through extensive reading of stories, dramas, poems, and myths from diverse cultures and different time periods, students gain literary and cultural knowledge as well as familiarity with various text structures and elements. By reading texts in history/social studies, science, and other disciplines, students build a foundation of knowledge in these fields that will also give them the background to be better readers in all content areas. Students can only gain this foundation when the curriculum is intentionally and coherently structured to develop rich content knowledge within and across grades. Through motivation and engagement, students also acquire the habits of reading independently and closely, which are essential to their future success.

ollege and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

The grades K–5 standards on the following pages define what students should understand and be able to do by the end of each grade. They correspond to the College and Career Readiness (CCR) anchor standards below by number. The CCR and grade-specific standards are necessary complements—the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity—that together define the skills and understandings that all students must demonstrate.

Key Ideas and Details

1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

Craft and Structure

4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.*

8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

*Please see “Research to Build and Present Knowledge” in Writing and “Comprehension and Collaboration” in Speaking and Listening for additional standards relevant to gathering, assessing, and applying information from print and digital sources.

Reading Standards for Literature K–5 [RL]

The following standards offer a focus for instruction each year and help ensure that students gain adequate exposure to a range of texts and tasks. Rigor is also infused through the requirement that students read increasingly complex texts through the grades. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each year’s grade-specific standards and retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades. Progress in each area is highly dependent upon and influenced by growth across the language domains. For example, growth in vocabulary will have a recursive influence on reading, writing, speaking and listening. Therefore, explicit vocabulary instruction should occur within each grade level. Standards related to Vocabulary Acquisition are detailed in the Language Strand starting on p. 34.

Kindergartners:

Grade 1 students:

Grade 2 students:

Key Ideas and Details

  1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

  1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

  1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

  1. With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.

  1. Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.

  1. Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral.

  1. With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

3. Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

  1. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.

Craft and Structure

  1. Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.

  1. Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.

  1. Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.

  1. Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems).

  1. Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of text types.

  1. Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action.

  1. With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling the story.

  1. Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text.

  1. Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  1. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).

  1. Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.

  1. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.

  1. (Not applicable to literature)

  1. (Not applicable to literature)

  1. (Not applicable to literature)

  1. With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories.

  1. Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

  1. Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

  1. Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding, including the appropriate selection of texts for personal enjoyment and interest.

    a. Identify the contributions of American Indian tribes and other diverse cultures within the Minnesota community through literature past and present. (Note: This concept will be further embedded in the second draft of the standards.)

10. With prompting and support, read prose and poetry of appropriate complexity for grade 1 as well as select texts for personal enjoyment and interest.

a. Identify the contributions of American Indian tribes and other diverse cultures within the Minnesota community through literature past and present. (Note: This concept will be further embedded in the second draft of the standards.)

  1. By the end of the year, select, read and comprehendliterature including stories and poetry for personal interest and other purposes, in the grades 2–3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

a. Identify the contributions of American Indian tribes and other diverse cultures within the Minnesota community through literature past and present. (Note: This concept will be further embedded in the second draft of the standards.)

    1. Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects (2)

      Документ
      © 2011 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Permission is hereby granted to copy any or all parts of this document for non-commercial educational purposes.
    2. Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in

      Документ
      This is the final draft of the English Language Arts standards proposed by the Minnesota Standards Review Committee. These standards will proceed through the state’s formal administrative rulemaking process and will not be adopted
    3. Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy

      Документ
      © 2011 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Permission is hereby granted to copy any or all parts of this document for non-commercial educational purposes.
    4. Oregon Common Core State Standards (ccss) English Language Arts (ela) Crosswalk

      Документ
      When Oregon adopted the Common Core State Standards in October 2010, our state joined other states in the pursuit of a common, standards-based education for our students, kindergarten through high school.
    5. Books on history of mathematics, science and technology

      Документ
      I started this in 1 in order to record books received. I have extracted relevant books from other lists, from lists of references in my papers and from Sections 1-3 of my Sources.
    6. Boolean Searching on the Internet: a primer in Boolean Logic

      Документ
      This fantastic PowerPoint offers a very concise (29 slides) rationale for teaching online reading strategies, identifies student behaviors that are indicators of poor reading strategies, and offers multiple suggestions for things teachers
    7. Office of the CommissionerAflatoxin (lac 7: XXVII. 128) 441 Children and Family Services

      Документ
      This public document was published at a total cost of $3,820. Five hundred copies of this public document were published in this monthly printing at a cost of $3,820.
    8. The Anthropology of Childhood

      Документ
      ��#ࡱ#� > �� u : : �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9 �9
    9. Beginner Pre-Service Special Education Teachers’ Learning Experience During Practicum

      Документ
      Social Developmental Parameters in Primary Schools: Inclusive Settings’ and Gender Differences on Pupils’ Aggressive and Social Insecure Behaviour and their Attitudes Towards Disability

    Другие похожие документы..